Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine Demonstrates Muscle Regeneration Proof-of-Concept

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine is making strides with “in body” regeneration of muscle tissue. Funded by the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine scientists have used rodent models to harness the body’s natural “regenerative machinery” to regrow segments of missing muscle.

Traditional methods of muscle regeneration involve moving muscle from one part of the body to another or regenerating muscle in the lab. Instead, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine scientists have used satellite and stem cells and scaffolding technology, along with an insulin-like growth factor 1 protein, to stimulate muscle cell regeneration in body. Studies showed that four weeks post-implantation the protein-laced scaffolds had up to four times the number of cells as well as increased muscle fibers than the plain scaffolding.

“Working to leverage the body’s own regenerative properties, we designed a muscle-specific scaffolding system that can actively participate in functional tissue regeneration,” said Sang Jin Lee, Ph.D., assistant professor of regenerative medicine and senior author. “This is a proof-of-concept study that we hope can one day be applied to human patients.”

Learn more about the Institute for Regenerative Medicine or read the announcement about this study.